Bad traffic has wide reaching health implications including nighttime domestic abuse

From the NYTimes:

Brutal commute toll: to save 1 minute of time spent in traffic, people would trade away 5 minutes of any other leisure activity

Extreme evening traffic on highways (double the usual time) increased the incidence of nighttime domestic violence by 9%

How do deal with this: “Throughout life, mindfulness, healthy eating, sleeping and exercise, and hobbies that blow of steam all help”, according to Rebecca Mooney.

References:

https://www.nytimes.com/2019/01/21/upshot/stuck-and-stressed-the-health-costs-of-traffic.html

How the ultra-rich deal with stress

From the Guardian: Burned-out billionaires are taking extended multimillion-dollar 'sabbaticals' to recharge:

A 40-year-old tech CEO, fresh off selling his multimillion-dollar business, embarked on an extended world tour, visited 66 countries over two years via private jet. The trip included learning to hunt with a bow and arrow with the San people in the Kalahari Desert and filming a documentary in South Africa – and it cost "well into the seven figures."

"It could be a couple of million dollars to take your family around the world with a teacher in tow."

These wealthy clients are looking for an escape, and some want that escape to be educational as well. "Often they want to get some sense of a back-to-basics lifestyle and learn the skills of our ancestors, like how to hunt and cook their own food," Barber told the Guardian.

References:

https://www.stuff.co.nz/travel/themes/luxury/109786608/burnedout-billionaires-are-taking-extended-multimilliondollar-sabbaticals-to-recharge

Parenting advice: 5 supportive gestures remembered by the mnemonic CLICC

Mnemonic CLICC:

Comfort: stay calm and patient
Listen: show interest in their passion
Inspire: expose them to new ideas
Collaborate: ask for their opinion
Celebrate: use “put-ups”, “not put-downs”

Comfort: stay calm and patient

Practice active listening and provide support.

For teens: Be present and pay attention to changes in behaviors. Offer validating and reflecting statements to help them label their own emotions when in distress.

Practice relaxation techniques such as counting to ten, deep breathing, meditation, or positive self-talk. Help them identify strategies to manage stress and control their impulses.

Listen: show interest in their passion

For teens: If a teen wishes to talk about a difficult topic, supportive listening helps them express their thoughts and make sense of their experience. Pick a safe place to talk during an activity, while playing video games or a sport, or while driving in a car. Give them time to express themselves. Allow them to share their story without interruptions, show interest, and be alert for moments of honesty and vulnerability. Give them time to express themselves before offering advice or help. Sometimes they will be more encouraged to express themselves when you are not looking directly at each other. Ask open-ended questions that require more than a yes or no answer.

Inspire: expose them to new ideas

For teens: Encourage Positive Thinking and Setting Goals. Encourage teens to try new things and to take part in healthy risk-taking. Suggest activities that allow them to practice skills and feel good about themselves. Ask teens who their role models are and why and help them focus on what qualities they admire. Be a positive role model yourself. When possible, create opportunities for them to meet or work with adults in areas that interest them. Explore their future goals and engage them in short and long-term goal setting —establish realistic, achievable goals. Provide opportunities for increasingly challenging tasks

Collaborate: ask for their opinion

For teens: identify and understand their obstacles, let them communicate how they’re feeling and describe the problems in their own words. Once they’ve communicated the issues, encourage them to identify potential conflict resolution strategies and pros and cons to different ideas. Engage them in a step-by-step problem-solving process until you reach a solution. Encourage them to reflect on how their peers and friends might be feeling during conflicts. Assure them that they can rely on you to be their sounding board.

Celebrate: use “put-ups”, “not put-downs”

Thus gesture supports the development of self-identity and reminds a child of their competence, importance, and lovability. When we acknowledge their birthdays, graduations or everyday accomplishments like completing their homework, meeting new friends or doing chores, we help children build positive self-esteem.

Provide affirmation and validation, recognize their individual and cultural uniqueness.

Simple examples: A cheer, a clap, a smile, a kind greeting or a statement that acknowledges them.

For teens: Encourage them to take part in activities they enjoy and that you can do together, such as video games, art projects, shooting hoops, etc. Invite them to talk about their successes and challenges and teach them the value of the process and not just the final achievement. Guide them in exploring cultural traditions and sources of cultural pride.

References:

https://changingmindsnow.org/healing
https://changingmindsnow.org/wp-content/uploads/2016/12/Comfort.pdf
https://changingmindsnow.org/wp-content/uploads/2016/12/Listen.pdf
https://changingmindsnow.org/wp-content/uploads/2016/12/Inspire.pdf
https://changingmindsnow.org/wp-content/uploads/2016/12/Collaborate.pdf
https://changingmindsnow.org/wp-content/uploads/2016/12/Celebrate.pdf

People overreport their height and underreport their weight. What are the real numbers?

From the NYTimes:

“People tend to overreport their height and underreport their weight,” said the senior author, Cynthia L. Ogden, an epidemiologist at the C.D.C. The new figures, she noted, are the result of actual measurements:

Meet the average American man. He weighs 198 pounds and stands 5 feet 9 inches tall. He has a 40-inch waist, and his body mass index is 29, at the high end of the “overweight” category.

The picture for the average woman? She is roughly 5 feet 4 inches tall, and weighs 171 pounds, with a 39-inch waist. Her B.M.I. is close to 30."

Men and women gained more than 30 pounds from 1960 to 2016.

According to recent longevity studies, the ideal BMI is closer to 20. The countries with the world's oldest populations are Japan, followed by Germany, Italy, Greece, Finland, and Sweden.

Long-lived Okinawans subscribe to the nutritional behavior of “hara haci bu” or “eat until you are only 80% full.” Their “rainbow diet” is based on diverse fruits and vegetables, with soy providing the bulk of protein intake. Their daily caloric intake is reduced, accounting for their low BMI of 20.



Interventions that promote longevity, remembered by mnemonic: DEEP purple - “eat colorful plant foods: Dietary modification, Exercise, active Engagement, Purposeful living (click here to enlarge the image).

References:

https://www.nytimes.com/2019/01/14/health/height-weight-americans-cdc.html

https://casesblog.blogspot.com/2018/12/exceptional-longevity-why-some-people.html

People who live in neighborhoods with green spaces have less stress, healthier blood vessels and lower risk of heart attack and stroke

People who live in neighborhoods with more green spaces may have less stress, healthier blood vessels and a lower risk of heart attacks and strokes.

Residential greenness is associated with lower levels of sympathetic activation, reduced oxidative stress, and higher angiogenic capacity. This is independent of age, sex, race, smoking status, neighborhood deprivation, statin use, and roadway exposure.

For this study (see the link below), researchers tested for a variety of biomarkers of stress and heart disease risk in blood and urine samples from 408 patients at a cardiology clinic in Louisville, Kentucky, USA.

Residents of the greenest neighborhoods had lower urinary levels of the hormone epinephrine, indicating lower stress levels, and lower urinary levels a marker of oxidative stress known as F2-isoprostane.

Green space might encourage more physical activity. A higher density of trees and shrubs may also improve air quality by reducing levels of some air pollutants.

Annemarie Hirsch, an environmental health researcher at Geisinger in Danville, Pennsylvania: "Green spaces can also increase the sense of social cohesion, a factor that has been associated with health and wellbeing, by facilitating interaction with neighbors.

Green space may also provide a barrier to stressful environmental features, including traffic noise and displeasing structures. At the same time, green space has been described as restorative, blocking negative thoughts and feelings and thus reducing stress.”

Sounds wonderful!



Interventions that promote longevity, remembered by mnemonic: DEEP purple - “eat colorful plant foods: Dietary modification, Exercise, active Engagement, Purposeful living (click here to enlarge the image).

References:

Leafy green neighborhoods tied to better heart health | Reuters https://buff.ly/2Rnvu6D
https://www.ahajournals.org/doi/10.1161/JAHA.118.009117
Exceptional longevity: why some people live to be more than 100-year old https://buff.ly/2CjcCeD