No Depression or Suicide Risk with Montelukast (Singulair) After All

In 2007, there were some concerns that suicide may be a complication of montelukast (Singulair) therapy.

A retrospective study sponsored by the American Lung Association has found no evidence of depression or suicide linked to montelukast.

The study findings will be published in an upcoming issue of the Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology.

Leukotriene Receptor Antagonists (LTRA)

Antagonists of the CysLT1 receptor (LTRA) are efficacious as controller therapy in asthma and montelukast is FDA-approved for treatment of seasonal allergic rhinitis.

Mast cells quickly generate different mediators from the metabolism of arachidonic acid: leukotrienes and prostglandins (LTC4, LTB4, PGD2). These substances are produced within minutes of IgE-receptor crosslinking on the surface of mast cells.


Eicosanoids are signaling molecules made by oxygenation of 20-carbon essential fatty acids. There are 4 families of eicosanoids (PP-LT): prostaglandins (PG), prostacyclins (PGI), leukotrienes (LT) and thromboxanes (TX).


Mast cell mediators including (PP-LT): prostaglandins (PG), prostacyclins (PGI), leukotrienes (LT) and thromboxanes (TX). See more Allergy and Immunology mind maps here.

References:
American Lung Association Study Finds No Evidence of Depression or Suicide Linked to Asthma and Allergy Drug Montelukast. MarketWatch, 09/2008.
Singulair (montelukast) and Suicide Risk
Image source: Montelukast, from Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia, public domain.

No comments:

Post a Comment

Blog Widget by LinkWithin